August 23, 2021

How Doyobi Designs for Engagement: Multiple Intelligences

If you’ve already read our previous article, you’ll know that at Doyobi, our mission is to develop the kind of content and tools to help teachers deliver an engaging lesson.

In trying to achieve this goal, all of Doyobi’s products have engagement purposefully designed into the lessons. One of the major pedagogical principles we use to drive student engagement is multiple intelligences!

Activate multiple intelligences

If you’ve ever heard someone say, “Oh, I’m more of a tactile learner. I learn best when I can get my hands dirty!” That comes from the extremely powerful and popular Theory of Multiple Intelligences popularized by the Harvard-trained American Psychologist, Howard Gardner.

Gardner’s theory intended to show that people actually learn things in several different ways – aka “modalities” or “multiple intelligences.”

Thus by catering to these different modes of learning, with different tasks oriented to the various intelligences, educators can help improve learning outcomes like memory and understanding.

This is why in each Doyobi lesson, we’ve included a range of different activities to cater to each and every student’s learning needs. Our platform harnesses the power of multiple intelligences and activates it in the minds of learners by visualising learned concepts, incorporating auditory elements or making our lessons kinaesthetically engaging.

Sneak peek of our lessons

In Lesson 28’s activity “Let's explore some material properties,” students get to bring experiments online by harnessing the kinesthetic, auditory and visual elements of learning.

           

                   

                                                                                                                                                                 

         

   

In Lesson 24’s activity “Algorithm for backdrop switch,” students build a shadow scenario based on their scientific understanding of shadow properties acquired in the lesson.

           

                   

                                                                                                                                                                 

         

   

In Lesson 31’s activity “Time for experiment,” students get to ‘click-and-explore’ which  reading format for visual and kinesthetic learners

           

                   

                                                                                                                                                                 

         

   

By appealing to each student’s individual multiple intelligences, we help them understand the material in an engaging and meaningful way!

Try it for yourself

At Doyobi, our curriculum design and lesson planning is an integral part to creating the best learning experience for students. We hope that these articles have given you a better idea of how we design our products here at Doyobi.

Want to know how you can get started? Try out our starter pack and get access to lessons mapped to leading Science curricula as well as Scratch coding lessons!

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